Puerto Rico’s Water and Sanitation Crisis: How the Government is Failing to Ensure this Basic Human Right?

By Jennifer Natoli, Contributor  In the shorter term, Puerto Ricans remain wary of their water. Residents that can afford to purchase water from local stores say that they will continue to do so into the foreseeable future. According to the United Nations, access to clean water and adequate sanitation are integral human rights that governments, … Continue reading Puerto Rico’s Water and Sanitation Crisis: How the Government is Failing to Ensure this Basic Human Right?

Human Rights Abuses In Trinidad and Tobago: A Look At Its Police and Prison Service

By Margreta Davis, Contributor  As many as 15 prisoners are crammed into a cell making it difficult to sleep. Prisons are in deplorable conditions, infested with rats and cockroaches. Trinidad and Tobago (T&T), officially known as the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, is the southernmost nation in the Caribbean. It is a sovereign twin island … Continue reading Human Rights Abuses In Trinidad and Tobago: A Look At Its Police and Prison Service

The Dead Pakistani Schoolchildren: Why Were They Killed?

By Aslam Kakar, Contributor The poetess Cynthia BuhainBaello says, Violence is the mark of brutes,  Unthinking, inhuman, brainless. Death and grief are their bitter fruits They are empty of any goodness. The cold New Jersey night of December 13, 2014, feels ever fresh in memory when on the morning of December 14 in Pakistan, six … Continue reading The Dead Pakistani Schoolchildren: Why Were They Killed?

Russia’s Revival of “The Third Rome”?

By Vakhtang Kiziriya, Contributor  According to Filofei’s envisioned doctrine, the fledgling Muscovite state was bound to assume the legacy of a failed Rome and Byzantine Empire to become a spiritual and political leader of the world. The mythical concept of the Russian state as the the Third Rome or the messianic Christian Empire rising to fulfill an … Continue reading Russia’s Revival of “The Third Rome”?

Saudi Arabia and Human Rights: The Killing of Jamal Khashoggi

By Christian Hess, Contributor We must always remind ourselves that journalists must not only be able to report on events as they occur, but to also be able to do so without fear for their lives or otherwise. By honoring those like Jamal Khashoggi and sharing his story, we can assure his sacrifice is not forgotten … Continue reading Saudi Arabia and Human Rights: The Killing of Jamal Khashoggi

Rutgers’ Official Launch of the University Alliance for Refugees and At-Risk Migrants (UARRM)

By Jane Roche and Christina Lobruto ,Contributors On Monday, July 23, 2018, Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey hosted the Official Launch of the University Alliance for Refugees and At-Risk Migrants (UARRM). The UARRM is a group of researchers, practitioners, and policymakers seeking to harness the potential of university communities for the empowerment of … Continue reading Rutgers’ Official Launch of the University Alliance for Refugees and At-Risk Migrants (UARRM)

The Convergence of Activism and Academia at the Oslo Freedom Forum

By Lillian Hussong, Contributor “Once people begin to believe, at least in principle, in human equality, there is no logical limit to the expansion of human rights and self-determination.” —Martha Finnemore I was one of six graduate students from the Rutgers University Division of Global Affairs who travelled to Norway to attend the 10th annual … Continue reading The Convergence of Activism and Academia at the Oslo Freedom Forum

The Evolution and Role of European Convention on Human Rights and European Court

By Karin Nordin, Contributor After the turbulence caused by World War II, the world, especially Europe, feared for similar events to occur in the future, as a result the first written text promoting peace and diplomacy arose, in 1948, the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights emerged and demonstrated as a turning point in … Continue reading The Evolution and Role of European Convention on Human Rights and European Court

Rutgers University Launches New Research Program on Genocide and Atrocity Prevention

By Lillian Hussong, Contributor Syrian civilians in Damascus suffered a government-perpetrated chemical attack during the week of April 7, 2018, killing seventy and injuring hundreds.  Delegates from the United Nations Security Council travelled to Bangladesh during the week of April 29 to meet with Rohingyan refugees fleeing Myanmar, where they continually suffer persecution for their collective … Continue reading Rutgers University Launches New Research Program on Genocide and Atrocity Prevention

Human Rights Violations of Homosexuals in Chechen Republic

By Christian Hess, Contributor Within the first few months of 2017, reports emerged from the Chechen Republic that homosexual men were abducted from their homes. From there, they were sent to make-shift concentration camps where they were beaten and electrocuted. The leader of the Chechen Republic, Ramzan Kadyrov denied these reports. He stated there were no … Continue reading Human Rights Violations of Homosexuals in Chechen Republic